Should All-time Records ONLY Be Set On Calibrated Plates?

Mon, 09/21/2015 - 12:39 -- admin
Yes: They should be calibrated plates only (Calibrated Plates in either Lbs or KG)
49% (498 votes)
No: Leave as is
12% (124 votes)
Yes: Calibrated Kilos only
22% (226 votes)
No: They can be either calibrated or weighed. Face Value will be for rankings and actual weight for records
16% (160 votes)
Total votes: 1008

Comments

Submitted by Ed Kutin on
I'm going to ask a question here. Why make a big deal about calibrated vs. non-calibrated plates? Yes, calibrated plates are somewhat more accurate, but judging standards can be so different from one Fed to the next that the advantage given can be vastly bigger than any small difference in plate weights that may or not be present from plates that are calibrated when manufactured. Huge difference in squats, some in the bench. Not is much in the deadlift, but different bars used do make a big difference. There will always be issues in trying to have cross-federation records, but any fixes you try to make will have other problems. Is it really that broken that it needs fixing?

Submitted by JASON MANENKOFF on
[quote=Ed Kutin]I'm going to ask a question here. Why make a big deal about calibrated vs. non-calibrated plates? Yes, calibrated plates are somewhat more accurate, but judging standards can be so different from one Fed to the next that the advantage given can be vastly bigger than any small difference in plate weights that may or not be present from plates that are calibrated when manufactured. Huge difference in squats, some in the bench. Not is much in the deadlift, but different bars used do make a big difference. There will always be issues in trying to have cross-federation records, but any fixes you try to make will have other problems. Is it really that broken that it needs fixing?[/quote] The judging standards are out of powerliftingwatch's control. Quality control in regards to equipment begin used is, especially in a sport where records are being broken by a fraction of a kilogram.

Submitted by AbeHarrod on
[quote=JASON MANENKOFF][quote=Ed Kutin]I'm going to ask a question here. Why make a big deal about calibrated vs. non-calibrated plates? Yes, calibrated plates are somewhat more accurate, but judging standards can be so different from one Fed to the next that the advantage given can be vastly bigger than any small difference in plate weights that may or not be present from plates that are calibrated when manufactured. Huge difference in squats, some in the bench. Not is much in the deadlift, but different bars used do make a big difference. There will always be issues in trying to have cross-federation records, but any fixes you try to make will have other problems. Is it really that broken that it needs fixing?[/quote] The judging standards are out of powerliftingwatch's control. Quality control in regards to equipment begin used is, especially in a sport where records are being broken by a fraction of a kilogram. [/quote] Plwatch has 100% control over what federations it lets into "the record books". They could very easily send a representative to random fed meets and spot check for what they consider acceptable. If I owned "the record books" (lol) they most certainly would not be open to anything that calls themselves a pl federation.

Submitted by Ed Kutin on
[quote=AbeHarrod][quote=JASON MANENKOFF][quote=Ed Kutin]I'm going to ask a question here. Why make a big deal about calibrated vs. non-calibrated plates? Yes, calibrated plates are somewhat more accurate, but judging standards can be so different from one Fed to the next that the advantage given can be vastly bigger than any small difference in plate weights that may or not be present from plates that are calibrated when manufactured. Huge difference in squats, some in the bench. Not is much in the deadlift, but different bars used do make a big difference. There will always be issues in trying to have cross-federation records, but any fixes you try to make will have other problems. Is it really that broken that it needs fixing?[/quote] The judging standards are out of powerliftingwatch's control. Quality control in regards to equipment begin used is, especially in a sport where records are being broken by a fraction of a kilogram. [/quote] Plwatch has 100% control over what federations it lets into "the record books". They could very easily send a representative to random fed meets and spot check for what they consider acceptable. If I owned "the record books" (lol) they most certainly would not be open to anything that calls themselves a pl federation. [/quote] Right! And it seems to me that if some Feds allow as much as 3-4 inches higher (or more) than others, that makes much more difference than calibrated vs. non-calibrated. Once there is better consistency in depth calls, sure go calibrated

Submitted by eggsurplus on
Non-calibrated with loose judging just exacerbates the difference that much more. Requiring calibrated plates controls one factor which helps to limit the potentially wide swing on performance outcomes.

Submitted by grissinger on
I voted by my real preference was not a choice, calibrated in ounces. Total would be much more impressive. Instead of a 2000lb total it would be a 32,000 ounce total.

Submitted by Jonathan Harder on
I think it would be great if they were all calibrated or weighed out. But then what about all the old records? Are they still good? We can't erase the old records. I think the best option is to put a note stating that the plates were weighed, calibrated or uncalibrated. I do hate seeing powerlifting meets with CAP style Chinese uncalibrated plates, and only go to feds with vintage yorks, eleikos, ivankos, or other calibrated plates. Heck my plate collection at home consists of vintage yorks and calibrated eleikos. I have even sold a pair of my milled york 35's to a meet director and verified to him that they weighed 35.0lbs

Submitted by eggsurplus on
Powerlifting watch cannot enforce judging standards to the same degree as it can allow or disallow records based on whether the plates are calibrated. The low hanging fruit here that is attainable right now is calibrated plates.

Submitted by ifwade on
[quote=eggsurplus]Powerlifting watch cannot enforce judging standards to the same degree as it can allow or disallow records based on whether the plates are calibrated. The low hanging fruit here that is attainable right now is calibrated plates. [/quote] This isn't really true: there simply isn't consistency within feds whether calibrated or non-calibrated plates are used. It is quite similar to squat judging: even if all the rulebooks read that lifters must break parallel, the simple truth is that some don't. For calibrated plates, the problem is that many local/regional meets don't adhere to standards of national meets. Even if a fed as strict as the USAPL, there have been violations of calibrated plates requirement. So unless PLwatch is willing to verify for each individual meet what kind of plate is used, there really isn't a way to verify this. Is PLwatch willing to do this? Also, many of the old records will have to be wiped: even the ones weighed out afterward don't fit the requirement of "calibrated plates." Lastly, this is more a question of what feds will still be allowed on the list. Can we get a list of feds' records that will be wiped and which ones will stand? That is what would be useful. Ultimately, what will happen is PLwatch records will become a list of one or two feds' records, and people will go looking elsewhere for the "real" all-time records list, on lift.net, other sites that keep such info. The strength of the PLwatch all-time list is its inclusiveness. The reason people look at it is because they want to know the most weight lifted in any fed, period. If we want to define things more narrowly, we all know where to look: we can just look at records from individual feds. Basically, an "all-time" list that includes only a handful of feds and ignores many, many huge lifts won't be interesting to many. It certainly won't be interesting to me. Let's remember that PLWatch's reasoning behind accepting Paralympic records was precisely that it already accepted a number of feds with bigger differences. To turn around and reject a number of records because of a more minute difference is a huge failure in consistency. Let's make sure this decision is made on reason and not popularity. Especially since one person can vote as many times as they want on this poll! Haha.

Submitted by ifwade on
[quote=eggsurplus]Powerlifting watch cannot enforce judging standards to the same degree as it can allow or disallow records based on whether the plates are calibrated. The low hanging fruit here that is attainable right now is calibrated plates. [/quote] Again, the goal of the all-time list isn't to exclude lifts: the goal is to provide a complete list of all lifts done across all feds. You're implying that we'd slowly eliminate any fed with lax judging, no drug testing, 24 hour weigh ins, etc. Again, if that's your goal, just look at IPF records! Simple. That's the fed with the strictest judging, everyone agrees on that. If I want to see a really strict, drug-tested, no wraps, walked out, atg squat, I go look for the IPF record. If I simply want to see the most weight ever lifted? I go to PLwatch list. If PLWatch list quits being inclusive, I won't be too interested in it anymore.

Submitted by ifwade on
Let me make 2 important last points. 1. Non-calibrated plates is not necessarily an advantage. The weights might have actually been heavier when weighed out. In fact, when I weighed out all the plates at my local gym on a medical scale, they all ranged from 45 to 48 lbs. Not a single one was less than 45. 2. People say, "Oh, but PL watch can't control squat judging." Fine, then don't use that as your example. Use 24 hour weigh ins vs. 2 hour weigh ins. If we really are all about making this list "fair" and more strict, then that is the single most ridiculous variation included on this list. I weigh a full weight class heavier when I move from 2 hour to 24 hour weigh ins. I am fine with having both on the list: I see the value of the list as being inclusive, a place where I can look to see heaviest weight lifted in a class regardless of fed. I'm not naive, I know it may be a fed with lax judging. But to throw out non-calibrated records and keep 24 hour weigh in records (even 48 hr in the case of WPO!) is absurd.

Submitted by ifwade on
I quickly went through the squat records on all-time list and referenced rulebooks for these feds. Here are the list of squats, and whether or not that will count: [quote] NO - 132 551 Mike Booker USA 2002 AAU NO - 148 556 Mike Kuhns USA 2006 ADAU No - 165 610 Justin Caputo USA 12/06/14 RPS NO - 181 744 Amit Sapir BC 07/25/15 CPL NO - 198 766 Amit Sapir BC 06/06/15 CPL NO - 220 785 Jordan Wong USA 05/30/15 RPS NO - 242 826 Kirk Karwoski USA 2005 AAU NO - 275 854 Stan Efferding USA 05/15/11 SPF NO - 308 914 Eric Lilliebridge USA 01/31/15 UPA Yes - SHW 938 Ray Williams USA 06/06/15 IPF [/quote] As you can see, all of these squats but one will be wiped from the books. This is based on whether or not rulebooks require calibrated plates. Of course, some of these feds may have used calibrated plates even though it was not required by the rulebook. In that case, powerlifting watch will have to confirm every meet individually, confirming with meet director whether or not calibrated plates were used. Is PLwatch prepared to do that? And can they even do so for historical records that were sets thirty years ago? Waiting for answers.

Submitted by billandapril on
I have to admit that the concept is a bore. Here we go again, let's regulate this, add rules for that, impose our own ideas on everyone for the sake of uniformity and conformity to get everything in line with one idea. Anyone still wonder WHY there are so many feds? This is why. My first rule is "if its not broke, don't fix it! And its not broken...

Submitted by eggsurplus on
Jumping to conclusions here. Making it required for records to be on calibrated plates is not a huge jump and isn't a slippery slope to enforcing IPF type standards across the board. It's just a small, attainable step that can help legitimize records a little bit more. Note: I don't personally hold crusade-like opinions on this. We'll all continue lifting either way.

Submitted by ifwade on
[quote=eggsurplus]Jumping to conclusions here. Making it required for records to be on calibrated plates is not a huge jump and isn't a slippery slope to enforcing IPF type standards across the board. It's just a small, attainable step that can help legitimize records a little bit more. Note: I don't personally hold crusade-like opinions on this. We'll all continue lifting either way.[/quote] Your claim that it is a small step and not a huge jump is simply untrue. Did you see post above? It would invalidate every single squat record from 132 to 308 on all-time list. It would actually erase more records than the other changes people are mentioning. So yes, it is a big jump.

Submitted by JASON MANENKOFF on
[quote=ifwade][quote=eggsurplus]Jumping to conclusions here. Making it required for records to be on calibrated plates is not a huge jump and isn't a slippery slope to enforcing IPF type standards across the board. It's just a small, attainable step that can help legitimize records a little bit more. Note: I don't personally hold crusade-like opinions on this. We'll all continue lifting either way.[/quote] Your claim that it is a small step and not a huge jump is simply untrue. Did you see post above? It would invalidate every single squat record from 132 to 308 on all-time list. It would actually erase more records than the other changes people are mentioning. So yes, it is a big jump.[/quote] If this was to come into play I could assure you that it would not be retroactive. It would be "going forward"..(for example... effective Jan 2016 giving federations time to comply) Furthermore, both Amit, Stan and Eric's records were done using calibrated plates despite if it's required of in the rulebook or at the discretion of the meet director/president of the organization. If a meet director cannot afford proper equipment he or she shouldn't be hosting a contest. One of the issues I see that I feel has a trickle down effect to the judging standards mentioned above is allowing ANYONE to host a meet.

Submitted by ifwade on
Thanks for the reply, Jason. Before going any further, I feel that I need to state I've competed across many feds--from the most lax to the strictest. In recent years I've come more and more to enjoy the stringent, depth-nazi, OCD, IPF way of doing things, despite its drawbacks. So let me be clear that I'm not at all against high standards. I just don't think that's what the all-time list is about. For me, it's about compiling all the heaviest lifts in one place for easy reference--full well knowing they were done under different conditions and in different feds. Your explanation that it would be a moving-forward requirement makes sense, and would certainly be more practical than wiping all the records and going and digging for whether they were done with calibrated plates. I suppose my issue would still be this: 1. I know many of those records were done on calibrated plates even though the fed doesn't require it. But your claim, "If a meet director cannot afford proper equipment he or she shouldn't be hosting a contest," seems to be based on the premise that meet directors should be ideally holding themselves to a standard not listed in the federation's rulebook. That seems quite simply unrealistic. If it is not stated in a federation's rulebook, then why expect it of the meet director? 2. Leaving old, uncalibrated records would add yet another level of inconsistency to the list. 3. It divides the entire sport of powerlifting on a criteria that we haven't even really considered very important before. There are big debates in PL: depth of squats, 2 hr. vs 24 hr weigh-ins, drug-tested vs. non-tested, monolift vs. no mono, deadlift bar vs. stiff IPF bar, and so on. Calibrated vs. non-calibrated plates? For many, this is a very minor point, and again, I might state, not necessarily an advantage. We KNOW a 24 hour weigh in gives an advantage over 2. We KNOW untested meet gives an advantage over tested. We know a high squat is easier than a deep squat. But an uncalibrated plate? It could be heavier or lighter. Unlike these other questions, it's not even a question of advantage: it's a question of precision. And if there is anything an all-time records list across 20 different feds isn't about... it's precision! Again, these are just my views. As I've said, I actually have come to enjoy the strictest forms of lifting: I love the IPF Raw Worlds with no wraps, no mono, drug-testing, 2 hour weigh ins--all of it. I just feel like the all-time list feeds the other side of my personality--the side that just wants to see how much Malanichev can squat with some wraps and no drug testing.

Submitted by JASON MANENKOFF on
[quote]1. I know many of those records were done on calibrated plates even though the fed doesn't require it. But your claim, "If a meet director cannot afford proper equipment he or she shouldn't be hosting a contest," seems to be based on the premise that meet directors should be ideally holding themselves to a standard not listed in the federation's rulebook. That seems quite simply unrealistic. If it is not stated in a federation's rulebook, then why expect it of the meet director? [/quote] No. I think that the rulebooks need to change. Why should uncalibrated equipment be allowed in a sport where records could be broken by fractions of kg's? Why does EVERY rulebook (unless I'm mistaken) require calibrated scales for weigh ins? Because EXACT weight is important in powerlifting. Why should the weights we use on the platform be any different than precision in regards to bodyweight. Then again I've been to meets that still use $20 bathroom scales. This needs to change. [quote]2. Leaving old, uncalibrated records would add yet another level of inconsistency to the list.[/quote] Eventually these records will all get broken. Most of the records on the list you posted are recent. [quote]3. It divides the entire sport of powerlifting on a criteria that we haven't even really considered very important before. There are big debates in PL: depth of squats, 2 hr. vs 24 hr weigh-ins, drug-tested vs. non-tested, monolift vs. no mono, deadlift bar vs. stiff IPF bar, and so on. Calibrated vs. non-calibrated plates? For many, this is a very minor point, and again, I might state, not necessarily an advantage. We KNOW a 24 hour weigh in gives an advantage over 2. We KNOW untested meet gives an advantage over tested. We know a high squat is easier than a deep squat. But an uncalibrated plate? It could be heavier or lighter. Unlike these other questions, it's not even a question of advantage: it's a question of precision.[/quote] Again standardized equipment is what helps to create legitimacy in sports. Especially a sport based upon quantitative data (weights,implements,times,distances). In track and field, a sport that is based on times and distances, tracks need to be measured and certified by the IAAF. Same goes for the pits for the jumps and circle and throwing areas for the throws. Implements must all be weighed and wind gauges calibrated. In football even the air pressure of balls need to be within certain PSI. We know which companies make calibrated weights. These weights would take quite a bit of effort to alter (shave down and repaint) if a meet director really wanted to be shady and do so. However he could easily pick the lightest plates in his gym to use without much effort. Not saying this is occurring but why provide that "option".

Submitted by eggsurplus on
Can't go back in time, but we can at least set a better precedence going forward. So still not a big jump for a little bit more of consistency.

Submitted by gack_the_ripper on
It's already been said, but there are other variables have a much greater impact. PLWatch should be as inclusive as reasonable (IMHBCO). If someone wants more strict (and arguably more credible), lift in a stricter federation. If you want a bigger lift, and can hang, choose the fed that suits your lifting style...and moves you up the PLWatch rankings. Ken Gack 'the Ripper'

Submitted by Billy on
Some of you act as if plwatch is the be all, end all of powerlifting. It is not. The site merely aggregates data from a fractured "sport". That said, this is no more a sport than it is a hobby. The only true sport is the Olympics. Nfl, nba, mlb, etc are nothing more than popular forms of entertainment. We can call them sports all we want, but they are just business set up for entertainment purposes. Lifters go where the rules and requirements fit their needs. Some lifters have the need to have their lifts validated in the strictest sense possible (ipf), while others just want to put heavy weight up. While it's great that the ipf has high standards and standardized rules, the actual act of judging a lift is subjective and I've seen plenty of good squats get reds, and some not so good ones get whites. So if it makes you feel better to lift in ipf rules, then by all means. You can view their records list for validation. This site however brings all the data together. @jason manekoff, you seem to be a highly outspoken proponent of enforcing rules and judging other people's lifts via had video; I find it ironic that you hold yourself and others to such a high standard, yet you have competed in meets that use bathroom scales for weigh in. If you really had that much integrity, you would have demanded your entry fee back and walked away. But I'm sure you competed anyway then bragged about your 165, 2 hour weighin, "tested", AAmerican record.

Submitted by JASON MANENKOFF on
[quote] @jason manekoff, you seem to be a highly outspoken proponent of enforcing rules and judging other people's lifts via had video; I find it ironic that you hold yourself and others to such a high standard, yet you have competed in meets that use bathroom scales for weigh in. If you really had that much integrity, you would have demanded your entry fee back and walked away. But I'm sure you competed anyway then bragged about your 165, 2 hour weighin, "tested", AAmerican record.[/quote] "Billy", I could have done it with plastic weights filled with sand in your parents tool shed with both of them judging and it'd still be superior to any of your accomplishments proudly displayed in their living room.

Submitted by Billy on
[quote=JASON MANENKOFF] "Billy", I could have done it with plastic weights filled with sand in your parents tool shed with both of them judging and it'd still be superior to any of your accomplishments proudly displayed in their living room.[/quote] I like how you totally disregard my very valid point, and go straight for a lame attempt at a personal attack. I don't know what "accomplishments" you have or think you have other than being a little turd.

Submitted by markos on
A bigger issue is the updating of the All Time list, which I know is a massive task. For instance, when Jesse Norris went 915kg@90kg, you guys ran a feature, but that performance is not ranked. Odell Manuel 1050kg@SHW, not listed. There are many more, I just thought I'd highlight a couple. I know the onus is on meet directors to send in sheets, but if I can find these, surely someone else can as well, and like I said, I watched the Norris performance vids on PW

Submitted by markos on
Jason, the sport is NOT based on quantative data, the records are, the sport is based on competition, where each lifter on a particular platform has the same advantages and disadvantages. Its impossible in a fractured sport to have any kind of accuracy in regards to records, there cannot be anyone left that doesnt understand this. Calibrated plates are merely for records. The competition on the day wont suffer without them truth be told. And I have 3000kg of calibrated plates in my gym, so I'm not simply saying that because we cant afford them

Submitted by JASON MANENKOFF on
[quote=markos]Jason, the sport is NOT based on quantative data, the records are, the sport is based on competition, where each lifter on a particular platform has the same advantages and disadvantages. Its impossible in a fractured sport to have any kind of accuracy in regards to records, there cannot be anyone left that doesnt understand this. Calibrated plates are merely for records. The competition on the day wont suffer without them truth be told. And I have 3000kg of calibrated plates in my gym, so I'm not simply saying that because we cant afford them[/quote] Since we don't know when and where records are going to be set/broken how do you suggest this work (without requiring all contests to use calibrated disks)?

Submitted by eggsurplus on
It's a fun, hypothetical poll. Really though, if you can make records a little more accurate going forward without too much work then what is there to lose? The calibration requirement would be a fairly simple one to implement going forward. Doesn't need a high level of (or any) policing. The sport has a way of finding people who try to lie. Tribal shaming.

Submitted by ifwade on
[quote=eggsurplus]It's a fun, hypothetical poll. Really though, if you can make records a little more accurate going forward without too much work then what is there to lose? The calibration requirement would be a fairly simple one to implement going forward. Doesn't need a high level of (or any) policing. The sport has a way of finding people who try to lie. Tribal shaming.[/quote] How would it be simple to implement, though? If we aren't going to go by the feds' rulebooks, PLWatch would need to confirm with each meet director individually. How is that simple to implement? Please explain how PLWatch would verify whether or not plates were calibrated for lifts done in, say, the Ukraine, for example?

Submitted by J Cahill on
Eggsurplus is correct, and in my opinion having calibrated plates is a no brainer to legitimize all competitive lifts, not just records. As a meet director, it is my belief that you should always run meets with calibrated kilo plates if possible--and this is coming from a guy that personally owns over 6,000lbs of milled York and Ivanko pound plates. Another big advantage of the kilo plates is that they are much thinner, which gives the spotters more room to spot and also creates far less bar whip on bigger attempts.

Submitted by ifwade on
[quote=J Cahill]Eggsurplus is correct, and in my opinion having calibrated plates is a no brainer to legitimize all competitive lifts, not just records. As a meet director, it is my belief that you should always run meets with calibrated kilo plates if possible--and this is coming from a guy that personally owns over 6,000lbs of milled York and Ivanko pound plates. Another big advantage of the kilo plates is that they are much thinner, which gives the spotters more room to spot and also creates far less bar whip on bigger attempts.[/quote] I agree about this, and I would support adding such a requirement to rulebooks within federations. However, that's not the issue here. We aren't arguing over setting actual records in a particular federation. We're talking about keeping a list of records across federations that all vary wildly in their requirements. I've yet to see anyone explain how PL Watch would verify this across all powerlifting meets. To use the Ukraine as an example, how will PL watch verify whether the meets there were done using calibrated plates? Ukraine is actually a great example because Shaloha Arkady has broken all-time records in the Ukraine. As a previous poster in the thread has pointed out, the current all-time list isn't even up to date. If PL Watch can't even keep the list up to date (and no wonder, it's a big task!), can we really expect them to verify with each meet director, even overseas, what kind of plates were used at a meet?

Submitted by J Cahill on
Good points, I think that it could easily be done. The meet director submitting the results could indicate the brand of plates used at the meet, and if they weren't the calibrated kilo plates, then they would have to vouch that they were weighed. Whenever I have an American record at a USAPL meet I direct, I have to submit a copy of the scale calibration paperwork. Could a dishonest meet director cheat? Sure, but at least it would be a step in the right direction.

Submitted by justwatchin on
I don't see a point here. There is no limit to the length and bendiness of a DL bar either. If you want records for the strictest standards head over to the IPF website.

Submitted by eggsurplus on
You don't validate that they are calibrated. You put it on the community to call out dishonest meet directors. They are a rarity as it is so don't over complicate it. When results are submitted ask if they were done on calibrated plates. If so, what kind of plates. Have that displayed so if anyone else was at the meet it can be called out if obviously a lie. I think having the community enforce it is the best option. Common way of enforcing rules in general tribe like communities like this one. No need to send people as representatives to meets. That's just silly.

Submitted by ifwade on
[quote=eggsurplus]You don't validate that they are calibrated. You put it on the community to call out dishonest meet directors. They are a rarity as it is so don't over complicate it. When results are submitted ask if they were done on calibrated plates. If so, what kind of plates. Have that displayed so if anyone else was at the meet it can be called out if obviously a lie. I think having the community enforce it is the best option. Common way of enforcing rules in general tribe like communities like this one. No need to send people as representatives to meets. That's just silly.[/quote] So basically we should just take word-of-mouth and anecdotal evidence that people post on Facebook or IG? That seems an extremely sloppy way of verifying a very precise requirement. It's like saying, "We'll only accept bench records from feds that permit benches of X width." How do we verify that? "Ah, the 'community' will just let us know of any violations." This also assumes that all these records will be American. I keep up with the Russian PL community very closely on vk.com. They have their own all-time list, that differs a bit from PLWatch's. (For example, they did not count Eric Spoto's 722 because of lack of pause.) If you expect the 'community' to tell us about any violation, then we better learn to speak Russian... and the many other languages where these all-time records are set! Lastly, the meet directors may be totally honest, and complying with the requirements of their federation. Not all feds required calibrated plates. It's wrong to assume that any meet director not using calibrated plates is dishonest. Their allegiance is to their fed, not PL Watch. [quote=J Cahill]Good points, I think that it could easily be done. The meet director submitting the results could indicate the brand of plates used at the meet, and if they weren't the calibrated kilo plates, then they would have to vouch that they were weighed. Whenever I have an American record at a USAPL meet I direct, I have to submit a copy of the scale calibration paperwork. Could a dishonest meet director cheat? Sure, but at least it would be a step in the right direction.[/quote] Again, the language of "step in the right direction" assumes the beginning of a journey where we eventually end up with a very strict list on PLWatch. But PLwatch isn't a true PL governing body. It's just a website with a compiled list of records from different feds. That's cool, and I like it. If your goal is a really strict list, then you can easily find that: hint, IPF record list! Also, I don't believe that most of these records are submitted by meet directors, especially the many that come from overseas. That's why I used the example of the Ukraine, a country that has very little connection with the American PL community. We didn't know about Shaloha Arkady's record for about half a year. I actually am the one who submitted it, digging through Ukranian competition results because that sort of thing interests me. There would be absolutely no way of connecting with that meet director; there was no contact info listed whatsoever. And if there were, we'd have to get someone who spoke Ukranian to verify calibration of plates, etc. It actually takes a very specialized vocabulary: even someone fluent in Russian or Ukranian often may not know the specialized powerlifting lingo. There would doubtless be many other meets in foreign where it'd be impossible to verify if plates were calibrated or not.

Submitted by grissinger on
Not exactly on topic but is in regards to "World Records." A simple fix would be to require them to be set in legitimate "World Meets." Like IPF, WPC, WPF, GPC, IPL, etc.....This would help reduce backyard judging, questionable weigh ins, illegal gear and everything else that might go along with friends judging friends. Same with American Records, they should be done @ National meets.