USPF Adopts New Wording for BP Performance

Create: 07/06/2009 - 08:24
(updated with official wording) At the federation's Annual Meeting, at last weekend's Nationals, the USPF National Committe voted unanimously to define how low the bar can touch on a bench press. The current wording is that lifters must "lower the bar to the chest". The Executive Committee approved wording that defines the chest as ending at the pec line. Specifically, the new wording will read that "the chest area is defined as from the bottom of the collarbone to the bottom of the pectoral muscle line at the STERNUM." The bar can be touched no lower than that line. The new definition is the most restrictive in powerlifting. The IPF defines the the chest as finishing "at the base of the sternum / breastbone". A number of lifters at Nationals have indicated that judges began implementing the clarification the next day rather than waiting until it took effect after the competition.

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
I guess Belly benching is on its way out the door. I just don’t know how you can tell were the pec-line is when a lifters is wearing a bench shirt.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
What the fuck has where you tuch the bar got to do with benching? If you lower it to your dick or throat it really does not matter. Get it down and up with signals and its good. This is IPF-style bullshit

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Anonymous wrote:
What the fuck has where you tuch the bar got to do with benching? If you lower it to your dick or throat it really does not matter. Get it down and up with signals and its good. This is IPF-style bullshit
I agree with this. Why is it that they even make a rule like this. It should be a personal choice of strength and leverages as to where you place the bar. If your a fat ass and have almost zero bar travel that is something that others have to contend with, but it should not screw you. The one true rule that I hate and I know this is off topic, but the feet flat on the ground rule. Can somebody please explain this to me. I have done both, feet flat while competing with the USPF and tucking back on the toes. Why is this such a huge issue for judging?

Submitted by Steve Winburn on
Anonymous wrote:
What the fuck has where you tuch the bar got to do with benching? If you lower it to your dick or throat it really does not matter. Get it down and up with signals and its good. This is IPF-style bullshit
Lets all work on our reading skills. Following this comment the herd just ran wild bashing the IPF. This is a USPF rule. They are not affiliated with the IPF. The IPF is referenced as a comparison. In particular, that the USPF's new rule is more strict than the IPF's. Read. Reflect. Compose. Comment.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
This is to keep out the multiply lifters that have been coming over and throwing up ridiculous numbers and wrecking the single ply party.

Submitted by Long torso long arms (not verified) on
I don't even touch my pecs raw, I do not see how I could possibly do it in a shirt.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
The pec line? 1) i will put on a bench shirt and you tell me where this is. If you are a fat lifter you will be able to tell, not fat - you won't be able too. 2) since I have a torn pec, I have to lift with the elbows in. My raw bench is touching below my sternum. 3) watch any ipf bench meet and nobody has a clue what is going on with this rule, some lifters are belly benching and getting 3 whites while others are not and getting dq'ed.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Benchin with your elbows is good for the peck and shoulders. This new rule will increse injuries. Good luck with that. I will not compete were this rule is.

Submitted by Bill Newman on
Anonymous wrote:
Benchin with your elbows is good for the peck and shoulders. This new rule will increse injuries. Good luck with that. I will not compete were this rule is.
y'know..my right shoulder did hurt a bit after the meet...

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Great opportunity blown for the USPF - but hey let's follow the other Feds and push strong lifters away. That way, those who don't bench for sh** can at least place! Next I see them chalking the bar to see the where the bar rests on your chest - then doing a touch check to confirm you are not too low - Or maybe this is a strike at Titan since the shirts are made to touch lower.

Submitted by John Casciato on
The USPF is becoming more & more a fed to discourage lifters. It costs too much money to travel for a hobby only to go home because what you did in the last meet was no good this day.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
This is actually amzingly stupid!! It is a bench press not a chest press..depending on how you are built this can be difficult...touching the upper portion of the torso should be fine. It becomes less of a test of true power if you can not press from your idividual optimum pressing positon. USPF you have made some big gains as of late and on your way back to the top judging by the huge turn out at nationals...why screw things up?? Lame ass decision.

Submitted by BIG DADDY on
look i can understand why everyone is upset hell i'm pissed, but when rome you know the rest. in a moment of anger and haste i may have said i won't be back. now as usual I'm home my belly is full and the meet is over things don't look or feel so bad. now barring any other changes in the future i know what is expected and i will train within those guidelines.i don't think as grown adult the judges would intentionally single lifters out or at least i would hope not.my experience so far has been positive at least from my point of view. Steve put on a great meet i had a good time considering. " I fear no man nor do I have any limits " Charles "BIG DADDY" Bailey SPONSORED BY ELITEFTS

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Anonymous wrote:
It is called a bench press, not a belly toss.
That is funny shit. Lets call it a chest press,LOL

Submitted by Priest (not verified) on
Anonymous wrote:
It is called a bench press, not a belly toss.
I dont see why it has to either be a belly bench or a chest press? Why cant the rules state the bar must touch above the xiphoid process. Anything above this area is not on the belly and if people want to go a little bit lower at least it isnt on the abs. This is equivilant imo to saying you cant deadlift sumo. I think more people will end up with shoulder problems due to this rule change. I understand not wanting belly benching, but this is a whole different story. Oh well, we have to abide by these rules. Long live the USPF!

Submitted by Steve Denison on
Let me just chime in here and clarify that this was agenda Item 3. What it did was to add a note to the USPF rulebook in Part 4, line 9. The note will say that the chest area is defined as from the bottom of the collarbone to the bottom of the pectoral muscle line at the STERNUM. The bar can be placed no further than the bottom of the pectoral/Sternum line. This was submitted by Ted Isabella and was passed. The EC also approved the WPF rules to be used at all National championships. This is effective January 1, 2010. The WPF does not currently have a definition for the chest. So things could be different at Worlds in Vegas. The EC also left it up to State Chairman if they wanted to use WPF rules at the local level or stay with current USPF rules. For California I will go with WPF rules starting January 1 at all USPF local meets. This will better prepare lifters for Nationals and Worlds. Steve Denison www.powerliftingCA.com

Submitted by BIG DADDY on
Steve Denison wrote:
Let me just chime in here and clarify that this was agenda Item 3. What it did was to add a note to the USPF rulebook in Part 4, line 9. The note will say that the chest area is defined as from the bottom of the collarbone to the bottom of the pectoral muscle line at the STERNUM. The bar can be placed no further than the bottom of the pectoral/Sternum line. This was submitted by Ted Isabella and was passed. The EC also approved the WPF rules to be used at all National championships. This is effective January 1, 2010. The WPF does not currently have a definition for the chest. So things could be different at Worlds in Vegas. The EC also left it up to State Chairman if they wanted to use WPF rules at the local level or stay with current USPF rules. For California I will go with WPF rules starting January 1 at all USPF local meets. This will better prepare lifters for Nationals and Worlds. Steve Denison www.powerliftingCA.com
Steve quick question if the EC voted to adopt WPF rules as of next year how can each state elect to use rules that no longer apply and why would they.i thought accepting WPF rules applied down the line. i think if the USPF are going to ask the lifters to accept changes and adjust according such as this weekend. then its should do the same in regards to accepting the WPF rules every state should have to comply whether they like it or not.that i think would make better sense of what happened this weekend. once again steve you did a great job this weekend.

Submitted by Steve Denison on
BIG DADDY wrote:
Steve Denison wrote:
Let me just chime in here and clarify that this was agenda Item 3. What it did was to add a note to the USPF rulebook in Part 4, line 9. The note will say that the chest area is defined as from the bottom of the collarbone to the bottom of the pectoral muscle line at the STERNUM. The bar can be placed no further than the bottom of the pectoral/Sternum line. This was submitted by Ted Isabella and was passed. The EC also approved the WPF rules to be used at all National championships. This is effective January 1, 2010. The WPF does not currently have a definition for the chest. So things could be different at Worlds in Vegas. The EC also left it up to State Chairman if they wanted to use WPF rules at the local level or stay with current USPF rules. For California I will go with WPF rules starting January 1 at all USPF local meets. This will better prepare lifters for Nationals and Worlds. Steve Denison www.powerliftingCA.com
Steve quick question if the EC voted to adopt WPF rules as of next year how can each state elect to use rules that no longer apply and why would they.i thought accepting WPF rules applied down the line. i think if the USPF are going to ask the lifters to accept changes and adjust according such as this weekend. then its should do the same in regards to accepting the WPF rules every state should have to comply whether they like it or not.that i think would make better sense of what happened this weekend. once again steve you did a great job this weekend.
The WPF rules are only mandatory at National meets and optional for each state to adopt at the local level. I'm sure most state chairman will adopt the rules because it will better prepare their lifters for nationals and worlds. The EC did not want to force it down to the local level. There could be an agenda item at next years national meeting to adopt it down to the local level. I feel we are moving in the right direction. That's my opinion.

Submitted by Brad Cikana (not verified) on
Steve Denison wrote:
Let me just chime in here and clarify that this was agenda Item 3. What it did was to add a note to the USPF rulebook in Part 4, line 9. The note will say that the chest area is defined as from the bottom of the collarbone to the bottom of the pectoral muscle line at the STERNUM. The bar can be placed no further than the bottom of the pectoral/Sternum line. This was submitted by Ted Isabella and was passed. The EC also approved the WPF rules to be used at all National championships. This is effective January 1, 2010. The WPF does not currently have a definition for the chest. So things could be different at Worlds in Vegas. The EC also left it up to State Chairman if they wanted to use WPF rules at the local level or stay with current USPF rules. For California I will go with WPF rules starting January 1 at all USPF local meets. This will better prepare lifters for Nationals and Worlds. Steve Denison www.powerliftingCA.com
Steve, they should just let you run all the big meets since you are the only one that makes any sense. I want to also add that this change to the rule pretty much makes any of the current shirts worthless in this fed. They might as well make everyone bench raw or use an Inzer Blast shirt.

Submitted by Bill Newman on
Brad Cikana wrote:
Steve, they should just let you run all the big meets since you are the only one that makes any sense. I want to also add that this change to the rule pretty much makes any of the current shirts worthless in this fed. They might as well make everyone bench raw or use an Inzer Blast shirt.
nah, I think with the right tweaking a straight sleeve Katana or an Inzer Rage would be ok...just won't get as much carryover. of course...not being able to afford more gear this year means I might be screwed...

Submitted by Brad Cikana (not verified) on
Bill Newman wrote:
Brad Cikana wrote:
Steve, they should just let you run all the big meets since you are the only one that makes any sense. I want to also add that this change to the rule pretty much makes any of the current shirts worthless in this fed. They might as well make everyone bench raw or use an Inzer Blast shirt.
nah, I think with the right tweaking a straight sleeve Katana or an Inzer Rage would be ok...just won't get as much carryover. of course...not being able to afford more gear this year means I might be screwed...
Bill, I would love to see you do a bench with any type of katana where it touches your pec line. Never going to happen with those long hairy arms of yours.

Submitted by Suzanne Hedman (not verified) on
Steve Denison wrote:
Let me just chime in here and clarify that this was agenda Item 3. What it did was to add a note to the USPF rulebook in Part 4, line 9. The note will say that the chest area is defined as from the bottom of the collarbone to the bottom of the pectoral muscle line at the STERNUM. The bar can be placed no further than the bottom of the pectoral/Sternum line. This was submitted by Ted Isabella and was passed. The EC also approved the WPF rules to be used at all National championships. This is effective January 1, 2010. The WPF does not currently have a definition for the chest. So things could be different at Worlds in Vegas. The EC also left it up to State Chairman if they wanted to use WPF rules at the local level or stay with current USPF rules. For California I will go with WPF rules starting January 1 at all USPF local meets. This will better prepare lifters for Nationals and Worlds. Steve Denison www.powerliftingCA.com
Hi Steve, thanks for the clarification, and I appreciate the rules you will implement for CA. The only thing I do ask is that we as lifters be advised before our training cycle begins of the bench rule that will be enforced at World's. Will it be the WPF rule or will it be the newly passed USPF rule...or will it be a combination of the two? I believe we all just want to train in accordance with the rules that will be enforced. Also, would you consider sending an email to all USPF members summarizing the most significant differences in the USPF rules vs. the WPF rules that will be applied at Worlds in Vegas 2009. In closing, I think you did a great job with the meet this past weekend and you really are an asset to us in CA.

Submitted by Steve Denison on
Suzanne Hedman wrote:
Steve Denison wrote:
Let me just chime in here and clarify that this was agenda Item 3. What it did was to add a note to the USPF rulebook in Part 4, line 9. The note will say that the chest area is defined as from the bottom of the collarbone to the bottom of the pectoral muscle line at the STERNUM. The bar can be placed no further than the bottom of the pectoral/Sternum line. This was submitted by Ted Isabella and was passed. The EC also approved the WPF rules to be used at all National championships. This is effective January 1, 2010. The WPF does not currently have a definition for the chest. So things could be different at Worlds in Vegas. The EC also left it up to State Chairman if they wanted to use WPF rules at the local level or stay with current USPF rules. For California I will go with WPF rules starting January 1 at all USPF local meets. This will better prepare lifters for Nationals and Worlds. Steve Denison www.powerliftingCA.com
Hi Steve, thanks for the clarification, and I appreciate the rules you will implement for CA. The only thing I do ask is that we as lifters be advised before our training cycle begins of the bench rule that will be enforced at World's. Will it be the WPF rule or will it be the newly passed USPF rule...or will it be a combination of the two? I believe we all just want to train in accordance with the rules that will be enforced. Also, would you consider sending an email to all USPF members summarizing the most significant differences in the USPF rules vs. the WPF rules that will be applied at Worlds in Vegas 2009. In closing, I think you did a great job with the meet this past weekend and you really are an asset to us in CA.
At all WPF World meets you will see WPF rules applied. You will never see another nations rules applied. So you will never see USPF rules applied to any WPF World meet. That will never happen. Review the WPF rules online and be prepared under the current WPF rules for Worlds. The WPF bench commands are press and rack and that's what will be used at Worlds.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Everyone knows this is silliness...are these rules passed by ythose who no longer compete?? I mean come on now, let the members vote and see what they think...can't imagine many who actually compete would think that rule is reasonable, fair or for the good of the sport.

Submitted by twagner on
This is exactly what drove me away from USAPL meets. I have long arms and a short torso, I don't touch that high raw. I think some of the growth that the USPF has seen lately was related to the IPF's adoption of a similar rule, I think this is a very bad move. I was considering the USPF for a place to compete single ply, but if it's going to turn into the IPF then I'll just go somewhere else. These type of rules don't help anyone, what if they got rid of sumo deadlift and didn't let you squat wider than shoulder width? Part of this sport is determining where your best leverages are and manipulating them.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Like others have said, there is no way that a judge can consistantly find the bottom of the pecs at the sternum on every lifter, this makes the already difficult job of judging even more difficult. Another issue being that the shirts of today are made to groove the bar low to get the most out of the shirt. Restricting bar placement restricts the lifter, makes the totals lower, hurts sells of the equipment manufacturer, and hurts the membership totals of the feds, I dont see how this can be a good rule for anyone

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
New USPF benching rules = the restrictor plates of Nascar. Clearly implemented to slow the dramatic increase in bench numbers. Yes it is a bench press - not a belly press... but why wait until the Nationals to become sticklers for the rules? Those same judges that red-lighted many of the "belly" benches, are those seen in many videos on YouTube standing idle or celebrating while those big benches were given the ok. You cannot move the goal post at the 11th hour and expect everyone to be ok with it. If you are going to define what amount of leverage can be utilized, then will you (USPF) restrict the leg placement for the Squat? Will you (USPF) restrict the sumo? Will you USFP do away with the tapered collar of the Titan Super Katana (after-all) it's double ply over a single ply shirt. Will you USPF begin testing to level the playing field? Will you USPF begin to check the gear prior to every lift? Where does it stop? The USPF is made the USPF by the members - therefore the members should have a say in the way it is run - NOT JUST SOME HAS BEEN WHO DECIDES TO TAKE HIS SHORTCOMINGS OUT ON THOSE WHO CAN OUT LIFT HIM. FOR THIS NEXT YEARS NATIONALS AND THIS YEARS WORLDS WILL SUFFER.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Wearing a shirt bringing the bar to the bottom of the pec is a bit difficult. Most shirts grooves are not that high if you have a good arch. I don't even bring the bar that high benching raw. That would have to be a great adjustment and may be hard to learn. Benching to the sternum is one thing, but where the pec meets the sternum aleast a few inches higher than what I am used to.

Submitted by Marcus on
Hooray for California! That's good for us long-armed people. I don't even touch the bottom of my pecks when benching raw. It definitely makes sense to use the national and world rules at local meets. It'll be interesting how the rules are applied at future national meets. There was clearly a difference in interpretation with the east coast judges. It'll be interesting how they judge at the next nationals. www.wildirongym.com Become a fan of Wild Iron on Facebook

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Is there any good lifters out there who like this rule? I highly doubt it, maybe some dude with a 550lbs press thinks that it is fair, but i doubt there are any 700+ benchers who feel this is a good rule (regaurdless of where they touch). In my mind its always been a rule put in place to make the bad benchers feel better about themselves. I also touch below my sternum when benching raw, and it took me a few minutes just to find my sternum as my stomach is very hard in that area. Good luck another person finding it, let alone with a bench shirt on. Go to an ipf meet and everyone has custom shirts with the logos moved down 2 inches because that is the only real thing the judges have to look at.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Why raise the issue and feel it only applies to 700+ benchers? How many 700+ benchers are there in the USPF? I know of one in the 242's, and 2 in the 300+........ If your idea of a good bencher benches 700 or more - then I guess there aren't very many "good" benchers in the USPF are there?

Submitted by DrDudleyRobey on
I am concerned that there will be more injuries with this new rule Steve. We teach lifters to squeeze their back tight and tuck their elbows to protect their sholders and prevent injury. If you do this the touching the bar to your chest (in the fashion described by the rule above)this will cause the lifter to move the bar up toward their face (like a skull crusher) and with bench weights may be a disaster in the making (no one wants a lifter hit in the head or neck!). Flaring the elbows out is also known to damage sholders in lifters. Whatever decision you and the EC make please take into account the health of the lifters at these events. Edward G. Dudley-Robey, M.D. http://www.DoctorBench.com

Submitted by Putt Houston on
DrDudleyRobey wrote:
I am concerned that there will be more injuries with this new rule Steve. We teach lifters to squeeze their back tight and tuck their elbows to protect their sholders and prevent injury. If you do this the touching the bar to your chest (in the fashion described by the rule above)this will cause the lifter to move the bar up toward their face (like a skull crusher) and with bench weights may be a disaster in the making (no one wants a lifter hit in the head or neck!). Flaring the elbows out is also known to damage sholders in lifters. Whatever decision you and the EC make please take into account the health of the lifters at these events. Edward G. Dudley-Robey, M.D. http://www.DoctorBench.com
this is by far the most pertinent point of the thread, although I do agree with many of the comments. The sternum plate should be the lowest touch point. You should consider the benchers with great arches as well. The bottom of the pecs, I feel, is not the right spot as there is more potentiel for injury and really not possible with the newest shirts on the market. In the end, the USPF will do the right thing. They always do. Putt Houston

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Putt Houston wrote:
DrDudleyRobey wrote:
I am concerned that there will be more injuries with this new rule Steve. We teach lifters to squeeze their back tight and tuck their elbows to protect their sholders and prevent injury. If you do this the touching the bar to your chest (in the fashion described by the rule above)this will cause the lifter to move the bar up toward their face (like a skull crusher) and with bench weights may be a disaster in the making (no one wants a lifter hit in the head or neck!). Flaring the elbows out is also known to damage sholders in lifters. Whatever decision you and the EC make please take into account the health of the lifters at these events. Edward G. Dudley-Robey, M.D. http://www.DoctorBench.com
this is by far the most pertinent point of the thread, although I do agree with many of the comments. The sternum plate should be the lowest touch point. You should consider the benchers with great arches as well. The bottom of the pecs, I feel, is not the right spot as there is more potentiel for injury and really not possible with the newest shirts on the market. In the end, the USPF will do the right thing. They always do. Putt Houston
How can you tell where the sternum ends? Unless you have x-ray eyes you just can't. This is a rule that is 100% flawed as it is impossible to judge anywhere near accurately. Look at the IPF bench worlds, it was a total crap shoot if you got reds or whites for belly benching. How bout we just ban benchpressing alltogether?

Submitted by Putt Houston on
Anonymous wrote:
Putt Houston wrote:
DrDudleyRobey wrote:
I am concerned that there will be more injuries with this new rule Steve. We teach lifters to squeeze their back tight and tuck their elbows to protect their sholders and prevent injury. If you do this the touching the bar to your chest (in the fashion described by the rule above)this will cause the lifter to move the bar up toward their face (like a skull crusher) and with bench weights may be a disaster in the making (no one wants a lifter hit in the head or neck!). Flaring the elbows out is also known to damage sholders in lifters. Whatever decision you and the EC make please take into account the health of the lifters at these events. Edward G. Dudley-Robey, M.D. http://www.DoctorBench.com
this is by far the most pertinent point of the thread, although I do agree with many of the comments. The sternum plate should be the lowest touch point. You should consider the benchers with great arches as well. The bottom of the pecs, I feel, is not the right spot as there is more potentiel for injury and really not possible with the newest shirts on the market. In the end, the USPF will do the right thing. They always do. Putt Houston
How can you tell where the sternum ends? Unless you have x-ray eyes you just can't. This is a rule that is 100% flawed as it is impossible to judge anywhere near accurately. Look at the IPF bench worlds, it was a total crap shoot if you got reds or whites for belly benching. How bout we just ban benchpressing alltogether?
I should reiterate that I personally don't care where it touches. I just think the bottom of the pecs is a little extreme... maybe possible... but extreme nonetheless. Putt Houston

Submitted by Mark Bell (not verified) on
This rule is made and enforced by people with very weak bench presses. I'm talking about dudes that can't even bench double there bodyweight in a bench shirt! Can some one tell me for fuck sake why is there even a rule against belly benching? Let's put a cap on how much you can bench but let's open the flood gates on how much you can squat by going from 1.5 ply to a full on 2 ply. Single ply should mean single ply [No Briefs]. Plus it may prove dangerous for people to walk weights out with more gear.

Submitted by Zach Trowbridge on
Mark Bell wrote:
Let's put a cap on how much you can bench but let's open the flood gates on how much you can squat by going from 1.5 ply to a full on 2 ply. Single ply should mean single ply [No Briefs]. Plus it may prove dangerous for people to walk weights out with more gear.
Did they actually vote to allow full-leg briefs?

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Anonymous wrote:
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.
Your statement is actually not true. All competitive athletes know the rules in advance of the competition. To change the rules on meet day can mentally affect the athlete. Let the person's competitor mess with their head, not the people writing the rules.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on
Anonymous wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.
Your statement is actually not true. All competitive athletes know the rules in advance of the competition. To change the rules on meet day can mentally affect the athlete. Let the person's competitor mess with their head, not the people writing the rules.
Everyone has the same rules regardless of the timing of rule changes. Good lifters adapt and poor lifters whine.

Submitted by recognize (not verified) on
Anonymous wrote:
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.
the belly benchers will lose 100-150 off there bench press thats why there crying. without there belly benching shirts there true strength will show. great call uspf.

Submitted by powerjunkie666 on
recognize wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.
the belly benchers will lose 100-150 off there bench press thats why there crying. without there belly benching shirts there true strength will show. great call uspf.

Submitted by Priest (not verified) on
recognize wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.
the belly benchers will lose 100-150 off there bench press thats why there crying. without there belly benching shirts there true strength will show. great call uspf.
You sure about that? Belly benching was never allowed in the USPF. Why not enforce the rules instead of making new ones?

Submitted by Priest (not verified) on
recognize wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.
the belly benchers will lose 100-150 off there bench press thats why there crying. without there belly benching shirts there true strength will show. great call uspf.
If you are such a powerlifting purist, recognize, Why dont you complain about sumo deadlifters or sumo squatters. This is equivilant to telling a deadlifter that they have to pull with the feet inside the armpit line. And squat with your feet inside the same line. Will most squat less with this setup? Yes. Maybe 100-150 pound difference huh?

Submitted by Brad Cikana (not verified) on
recognize wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
I am amazed by the amount of whining - powerlifters are supposed to be tough people. All rule changes will apply to all lifters equally - deal with it! The best lifters always adapt to the conditions of the contest.
the belly benchers will lose 100-150 off there bench press thats why there crying. without there belly benching shirts there true strength will show. great call uspf.
What belly benching shirts are you talking about? THe USPF only allows single ply closed back shirts. Even so, none of those shirts were made for benching at the pec line. If you bench elbows in and shoulder blades back (which is the safest way to do it) it is almost impossible to touch the pec line with any of these shirts. It's not like we are arguing that they should allow open back double ply.

Submitted by JC Carter on
Brad Cikana wrote:
What belly benching shirts are you talking about? THe USPF only allows single ply closed back shirts.
Go look at Mark Bells single ply super katana clips or Mike Womac's 900 from the other day the only way to touch in a tight modern shirt is to touch low

Submitted by Brad Cikana (not verified) on
JC Carter wrote:
Brad Cikana wrote:
What belly benching shirts are you talking about? THe USPF only allows single ply closed back shirts.
Go look at Mark Bells single ply super katana clips or Mike Womac's 900 from the other day the only way to touch in a tight modern shirt is to touch low
That was the point I was trying to make-Even the shirts USPF allows are made to touch lower than the sternum.

Submitted by Jim Ray on
Brad Cikana wrote:
JC Carter wrote:
Brad Cikana wrote:
What belly benching shirts are you talking about? THe USPF only allows single ply closed back shirts.
Go look at Mark Bells single ply super katana clips or Mike Womac's 900 from the other day the only way to touch in a tight modern shirt is to touch low
That was the point I was trying to make-Even the shirts USPF allows are made to touch lower than the sternum.
I'd like to respectfully disagree with both of you. The Katana straight/sleave IS designed to touch within the nipple/pec line/sternum range. I pull my shoulder blades in and tuck and have no problem. (And I stuff my 59 flab into a 53 shirt almost by myself now!)

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