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How good are your raw lifts?

Hey guys this is Michael Taylor, I am a small time high school powerlifter. Though I am pretty excited to lift for the LSU team next year. I took the time to do a little research on the performance of other lifters so that you can visualize how well your lifts compare. The following chart is a very simple piece of work which I designed to rank men's raw and drug-free lifts.

Squat

< 1.0000 XBWT
1.0000 – 1.2499 XBWT
1.2500 – 1.4999 XBWT
Bad
1.5000 – 1.7499 XBWT
1.7500 – 1.9999 XBWT
Ok
2.0000 – 2.2499 XBWT
(2.2500 XBWT = Average Raw Squat)
2.2500 – 2.4999 XBWT
Average
2.5000 – 2.7499 XBWT
2.7500 – 2.9999 XBWT
Good
3.0000 – 3.2499 XBWT
(3.2500 XBWT = Average Elite Raw Squat)
3.2500 – 3.4999 XBWT
Excellent
3.5000 – 3.7499 XBWT
3.7500 – 4.0000 XBWT
> 4.0000 XBWT

> 5.0000 XBWT = Few people have achieved this level of strength.

----------------------------------------------

Bench Press

< .62500 XBWT
0.6250 – .74999 XBWT
0.7500 – .87499 XBWT
Bad
0.8750 – 1.1249 XBWT
1.1250 – 1.2499 XBWT
Ok
1.2500 – 1.3749 XBWT
1.3750 – 1.4999 XBWT
Average (1.5000 XBWT = Average Raw Bench Press)
1.5000 – 1.6249 XBWT
1.6250 - 1.7499 XBWT
Good
1.7500 – 1.8749 XBWT
1.8750 – 1.9999 XBWT
Excellent
2.0000 – 2.1249 XBWT
2.1250 – 2.2500 XBWT
(2.2500 XBWT = Average Elite Raw Bench Press)

> 3.0000 XBWT = Few people have achieved this level of strength.

-----------------------------------------

Deadlift

< 1.0000 XBWT
1.0000 – 1.2499 XBWT
1.2500 – 1.4999 XBWT
Bad
1.5000 – 1.7499 XBWT
1.7500 – 1.9999 XBWT
Ok
2.0000 – 2.2499 XBWT
2.2500 - 2.4999 XBWT
Average
2.5000 – 2.7499 XBWT
(2.7500 XBWT = Average Raw Deadlift)
2.7500 – 2.9999 XBWT
Good
3.0000 – 3.2499 XBWT
3.2500 – 3.4999 XBWT
Excellent
(3.5000 XBWT = Average Elite Raw Deadlift)
3.5000 – 3.7499 XBWT
3.7500 – 4.0000 XBWT
> 4.0000 XBWT

> 5.0000 XBWT = Few people have achieved this level of strength.

---------------------------------------------

Total

< 2.6250 XBWT
2.6250 – 3.2499 XBWT
3.2500 – 3.8749 XBWT
Bad
3.8750 – 4.6249 XBWT
4.6250 – 5.2499 XBWT
Ok
5.2500 – 5.8749 XBWT
5.8750 – 6.4999 XBWT
Average (6.5000 XBWT = Average Raw Total)
6.5000 – 7.1249 XBWT
7.1250 – 7.7499 XBWT
Good
7.7500 – 8.3749 XBWT
8.3750 – 8.9999 XBWT
Excellent
(9.0000 XBWT = Average Elite Raw Total)
9.6250 – 10.250 XBWT
> 10.250 XBWT

> 11.000 XBWT = Few people have achieved this level of strength.

---------------------------------------------

The squat and deadlift go up by a quarter of your bodyweight; they start off at your bodyweight and end at four times your own weight. And the higher the number, the better the lift. The bench press goes up by .125 increments and starts off at .625 times your own weight and ends at 2.25 times your own weight. The total is a sum of the corresponding numbers.

The way it works is you take what a normal person who trains can lift and place the number in the middle. You take elite lifters numbers and place them in a higher place on the chart. The next thing I did was place words to describe the lift by a common number and if the weight you lift over your weight falls in one of these places, you know the word to describe it. If you lift 1.5 times your own weight, your bench press is average, if you lift at or over 1.75 times your own weight, your bench press is good etc.

It’s very simple.

Now why such low numbers?

If you know, most totals over 9 times ones bodyweight are rare.

The average numbers are “average”

The lighter the lifter, the higher the pound for pound number and vice versa.

450 – 550 are typical elite deadlifts if you are a 114’er. Take a nice number like 4 and multiply it by 114 and you get 456. That falls between 450 and 550. These numbers come straight from the all time record books btw. Now take a SHW and you have a different story. Anything between 2.75 and 2.50 XBWT is elite. A 400 pound guy pulling 2.5 times his weight is 1000 and that is a pretty accurate number to use since most of the SHW deadlifts are in the 900’s and a 400 pound guy is pretty fat lol.

You take the average of the small guys pound for pound strength and the big guys pound for pound strength and you get a number coming out to be 3.375 XBWT. That number is what I would consider elite if a drug and equipment free 198er can pull or even squat times his own weight. Take Sam Byrd's 705 @ 210 for example. His lift is 3.36 times his own weight. The great thing about it is, the average weight of a man is 190 pounds, and the 198 pound weight class is smack in the middle of the other weight classes. This chart works like magic and it correlates so well to real life numbers.

Now the average pull is higher than the average squat and but because I know some people work differently, Like C4's 800 pound squat at 225, its 3.55 times his own weight. Becuase of this difference I came up with two new numbers. I did that becuase I thought it would more accurate to describe the strength of almost all elite lifters and their pound for pound strength. I chose 3.25 for the average raw squat and 3.5 for the average deadlift. The numbers still average out to be 3.375 so I kept as an average but placed sentences to denote the actual averages in another place on the chart. Notice that I only did that for the normal lifters only.

I did the same thing for every other lift.

The numbers make a whole lot of sense. And if you take a 3.25 XBWT squat, a 2.25 XBWT bench press and a 3.5 XBWT deadlift, you get a 9.0 XBWT total and I doubt that average can be any higher. If Sam Byrd, Tony Conyers, or Oleksander Kutcher total around the neighborhood of upper 8x or lower 9x then there is no reason to go higher. I am sure most people who pull 4.5x only specialize in deadlifts, etc. I only found midgets to be able to lift over 10 times their weight on the total.

Raw lifting is different from equipped lifting. And I think the predictability of raw Powerlifting is much simpler than equipped. The numbers are slow moving; only to be changed by a prodigy that has a little bit more than everyone else.

So that’s what that graph was for.

I hope I wasn’t too boring.

As for myself, it all started when I was 14 and I asked my father how good is a good bench press. Twenty years ago when he was my age, he was in the 148 pound weight division and had a raw bench press of over 300 pounds and that’s just over two times his own weight. I just got the hang of bench pressing and I was 110 pounds and could only do 115 when I asked him that question. Though for a skinny teenager like I was, 115 was good. So after I asked him the question, he quickly told me that from what he learned doing Powerlifting was a bench press over 1.5 times your bodyweight was good. I had the funniest look on my face because I didn’t really know what he meant. Until I realized that you take the weight you lift and divide it by your weight you get a number and the higher the number, the better the lift.

About two months after I started, I could only do 135 but I was getting closer to 1.5

And now at 18 years old I have a pretty good bench press. Its consistanty between 235 and 250 and my highest lift is 265. Pound for pound it is as good as my fathers was but is thirty or so pounds less.

Now what I did from there was to keep lifting correctly and keep eating. I gained twenty pounds and by the time I was in high school, my gym lifts were very good. My coach, Brandon Bankston, taught me the fundamentals of the sport and I owe much of what I do today to him. I learned the key to strength gains was to eat and switch your routine out often. I kept a log for when I needed it. Sometimes I ask myself what I did to get to here and I go and look and do it again. Things like that are what make me keep going.

I placed first in the 123 pound weight division that year I trained with him. I had a 650 pound total, which isn’t too bad for a skinny 14 year old.

Though from there on in I have been more dedicated to my school work and job and can’t train anywhere but home.

From the time I left the team I applied many of the concepts I learned to my training at home. I grew out of wearing equipment because I don’t benefit from them very well. I feel as if training my body to the limits with out the aid of steroids or equipment is the way to go.

So now my total is consistently between 900 and 1000, my best being 1000, and I weight about 135 pounds. Replicating these numbers next year at LSU is my only short term goal. I want to get my 7.5 x total in a meet and after that, I want to go for 8x and by my junior year, I want to go for 9x. It’s sure possible, a guy can dream right?

--Michael Taylor--

Comment viewing options

Michael,

I don't quite understand why, if you acknowledge that lighter guys have a big advantage in terms of calculating BW ratios (as you do in your verbal discussion), your charts don't take that into consideration.

For instance, you say that a 4x BWT deadlift is "elite" for a 114 pounder but a 2.5x BWT deadlift is elite for a SHW. Yet on your chart a 2.5x simply falls in the lower end of the "average" range.

If you really want to be serious about creating charts like this you need to do it by weight class.

Perhaps more importantly, I object to when people call BWT ratios "levels of strength" (which is what your chart implies (the end statement is always "few people have achieved this level of strength").

Strength is measured by how much weight you can lift. If one guy pull 600 pounds and another 500 pounds the first guy is stronger. It doesn't matter if he weighs 350 and the second guy 150.

Now the second guy is probably a better athlete, perhaps even a better powerlifter (certainly he's going to win many more meets) but STRONGER he is not.

More plates = stronger. QED.

Your formula here appears to be for the lower weights, but for the upper weights and super heavy's it doesn't work. For instance Brian Siders 625 lbs raw bench at 335 lbs would equal a 1.86; making him a good raw bencher?
The multi-ply guys (Andy B) who holds the deadlift record of 1003 lbs at a body weight of 350 lbs would be a 2.86; making him an average deadlifter?
You do state a 1000 lbs deadlift by a 400 man is elite, but your chart doesn't reflect it???
I could be reading it wrong, someone please explain!

I can't even read all that mess.

Putt Houston.... now with more Bom Chicka Wahwahhhhhh

"A 400 pound guy pulling 2.5 times his weight is 1000 and that is a pretty accurate number to use since most of the SHW deadlifts are in the 900’s and a 400 pound guy is pretty fat lol."

yikes... is this the mentatlity that younger lifters have. that 900 deadlifts are common. there are only a handful of guys to EVER pull 900, yet you say that most of these guys are there anyway. you should worry less about statistics and how the SHW loses the BW/strength battle and realize that only the people lifting under 181's care about those classes.

your weight classes are the undercards for the actual events. your non chalance at a 900 pound deadlift just shows your seperation.

I know he's only in high school and applaud his intellectual curiosity, but it is obvious that even a rudimentary statistical analysis would probably not support his rankings. If someone really wanted to take the time to analyze the distribution of lifts, some kind of parametric or non-parametric class-based tests would probably be a lot more indicative of where the "average" lifter falls, regardless of bodyweight.

If you want to know how good of a raw lifter enter a world or national event with your weight class loaded.If you want to know on paper how you stack up look at 100% raw classification chart.

SFW wrote:
"A 400 pound guy pulling 2.5 times his weight is 1000 and that is a pretty accurate number to use since most of the SHW deadlifts are in the 900’s and a 400 pound guy is pretty fat lol."

yikes... is this the mentatlity that younger lifters have. that 900 deadlifts are common. there are only a handful of guys to EVER pull 900, yet you say that most of these guys are there anyway. you should worry less about statistics and how the SHW loses the BW/strength battle and realize that only the people lifting under 181's care about those classes.

your weight classes are the undercards for the actual events. your non chalance at a 900 pound deadlift just shows your seperation.

lol... in the mid nineties this college dude came over with one of my wife's friends and recognized I was a lifter. Now here goes the story of " I know this one guy who can lift blah blah blah..." Anyways, he tells me in HIGH SCHOOL is friend pulled 900lbs. I said really? I bet you didn't know your friend is the strongest kid alive since only a handful of professional powerlifters have ever done it. He said "no, he's no powerlifter or nothing, he used one of those trap bars." [for anyone who doesn't know, a trap bar is shaped like a steel welded diamond with handles, and you stand on the inside and pick it up to waist level.] lol and walking away I said Yeah, that would make it ten times harder even.....

Putt Houstonlol... in the mid nineties this college dude came over with one of my wife's friends and recognized I was a lifter. Now here goes the story of " I know this one guy who can lift blah blah blah..." Anyways, he tells me in HIGH SCHOOL is friend pulled 900lbs. I said really? I bet you didn't know your friend is the strongest kid alive since only a handful of professional powerlifters have ever done it. He said "no, he's no powerlifter or nothing, he used one of those trap bars." [for anyone who doesn't know, a trap bar is shaped like a steel welded diamond with handles, and you stand on the inside and pick it up to waist level. wrote:
lol and walking away I said Yeah, that would make it ten times harder even.....

I'd be shocked if there were very many guys who could pull 900 on a trap bar

Crap. I have to pull 770 to be average.

The chart shows 3xbw bench and 5xbw for deadlit and squat as being the very top of the chart. Realistically who has ever pulle or squated 5x or benched 3x bw raw and drug free as the chart stated it is designed for. I think only 4 or 5 people have benched 3x raw and I doubt they were drug free. THe heaviest 3x bw bench is Weill's 556@181. Who squats or deadlifts 5x bw raw?

dan g wrote:
The chart shows 3xbw bench and 5xbw for deadlit and squat as being the very top of the chart. Realistically who has ever pulle or squated 5x or benched 3x bw raw and drug free as the chart stated it is designed for. I think only 4 or 5 people have benched 3x raw and I doubt they were drug free. THe heaviest 3x bw bench is Weill's 556@181. Who squats or deadlifts 5x bw raw?

aww, come on, for a 308 that’s only 1500 lbs and just a bit more for a SHW.

I've admitantly spent too many years in college doing similar forms of overthinking a simple process. The one thing I've learned is that people who spend this much time analyzing things like weights lifted without paying attention to real world conclusions of their calculated outcomes and trying to rank them have too much time on their hands. Now this is a high school kid and obviously has high school kid enthusiasm, but what he needs to do is get under a bar and lift some heavy weight. Coming up with new ways to compare weights lifted does nothing for the ultimate goal----increasing the amount of weight YOU move. You are the one lifting the most weight you lift. It doesn’t matter what someone else does, because they aren’t lifting the weight for you.

I didn't analyze everything, but a 500lb deadlift at 181, raw & drug-free is certainly better than average.

Putt Houston.... now with more Bom Chicka Wahwahhhhhh

Putt do you mean my 560 pull last years really was better than just average?? Well at least I made the top 10 in the Lifter Rankings.. I'll go for 600+ this year and maybe I'll be just "good" according to this chart..LOL

Well when I get average I'll call you. These high school kids are really pushing the bar right now. lol

Putt Houston.... now with more Bom Chicka Wahwahhhhhh

Roy Lamont wrote:
Your formula here appears to be for the lower weights, but for the upper weights and super heavy's it doesn't work. For instance Brian Siders 625 lbs raw bench at 335 lbs would equal a 1.86; making him a good raw bencher?
The multi-ply guys (Andy B) who holds the deadlift record of 1003 lbs at a body weight of 350 lbs would be a 2.86; making him an average deadlifter?
You do state a 1000 lbs deadlift by a 400 man is elite, but your chart doesn't reflect it???
I could be reading it wrong, someone please explain!

I can since I wrote it.

A 1.86 Pound for pound bench is elite, if its a SHW.

The heavier you are the lower your pound for pound strength has to be in order to be considered good and vice versa.

A 2.5 to 2.75 pound for pound deadlift would be considered elite in the SHW.

Doc Iron wrote:
Michael,

I don't quite understand why, if you acknowledge that lighter guys have a big advantage in terms of calculating BW ratios (as you do in your verbal discussion), your charts don't take that into consideration.

For instance, you say that a 4x BWT deadlift is "elite" for a 114 pounder but a 2.5x BWT deadlift is elite for a SHW. Yet on your chart a 2.5x simply falls in the lower end of the "average" range.

If you really want to be serious about creating charts like this you need to do it by weight class.

Perhaps more importantly, I object to when people call BWT ratios "levels of strength" (which is what your chart implies (the end statement is always "few people have achieved this level of strength").

Strength is measured by how much weight you can lift. If one guy pull 600 pounds and another 500 pounds the first guy is stronger. It doesn't matter if he weighs 350 and the second guy 150.

Now the second guy is probably a better athlete, perhaps even a better powerlifter (certainly he's going to win many more meets) but STRONGER he is not.

More plates = stronger. QED.

Well I can certainly understand what you are saying.

I say that a 2.5 x deadlift falls in the average range for average people.

Now, it depends in weight class your in as well.

If you weigh 300 pounds, a 2.5x deadlift is excellent if not elite.

Now my charts do indeed do not take that into consideration

which is why I did in my discussion.

And I did do that with the weight classes, they didnt show up on this website correctly for some reason.

Now I think strength is a relative term.

Its a misnomer to call this sport powerlifting but its equally odd to call pound for pound strength..."strength" lol

I have to admit thats a mistake haha. BUt I also have to say that you gotta be pretty effin strong to lift that many times your own weight.

SFW wrote:
"A 400 pound guy pulling 2.5 times his weight is 1000 and that is a pretty accurate number to use since most of the SHW deadlifts are in the 900’s and a 400 pound guy is pretty fat lol."

yikes... is this the mentatlity that younger lifters have. that 900 deadlifts are common. there are only a handful of guys to EVER pull 900, yet you say that most of these guys are there anyway. you should worry less about statistics and how the SHW loses the BW/strength battle and realize that only the people lifting under 181's care about those classes.

your weight classes are the undercards for the actual events. your non chalance at a 900 pound deadlift just shows your seperation.

You are correct when you say only a handfull of people ever pulled 900.

But I am correct to say that people that pull 900 are elite and that most people in the SHW pull in the 900s, which is what is stated well, implied. I should of done better wording with that.

JK wrote:
dan g wrote:
The chart shows 3xbw bench and 5xbw for deadlit and squat as being the very top of the chart. Realistically who has ever pulle or squated 5x or benched 3x bw raw and drug free as the chart stated it is designed for. I think only 4 or 5 people have benched 3x raw and I doubt they were drug free. THe heaviest 3x bw bench is Weill's 556@181. Who squats or deadlifts 5x bw raw?

aww, come on, for a 308 that’s only 1500 lbs and just a bit more for a SHW.

I've admitantly spent too many years in college doing similar forms of overthinking a simple process. The one thing I've learned is that people who spend this much time analyzing things like weights lifted without paying attention to real world conclusions of their calculated outcomes and trying to rank them have too much time on their hands. Now this is a high school kid and obviously has high school kid enthusiasm, but what he needs to do is get under a bar and lift some heavy weight. Coming up with new ways to compare weights lifted does nothing for the ultimate goal----increasing the amount of weight YOU move. You are the one lifting the most weight you lift. It doesn’t matter what someone else does, because they aren’t lifting the weight for you.

I do agree with what you say.

This chart is not meant to be 100 percent accurate.

Now, with that said, This is the first time in three years I have opened my mouth.

lol

I am enthusiatic and the point of this discussion was to raise awarness.

I want to let people know who I am.

I dont ever speak without doing or speak without researching.

I read

I lift

I get under a bar and lift heavy weight in a shit hole about 6 feet wide, 7 feet tall and 9 feet deep.

I lift regardless...

Liftings what counts. I dont do this ever, I just thought that not being an anonmous poster on this site and telling a little bit about myself and what I think is really what is good in this sport would be a great thing.

I'm a student and oviously with a job and a education to tend to, I cannot prestly LIFT in meets.

I really wish time and money was bestowed upon me so I can do more of what I enjoy.

I wasnt brought up in a family that dedicates their time to take me out of school to do just powerlifting.

I take one time and one time only to tell you what I think.

Oviously if you take steroids and lift with equipment then this chart doesnt represent anything you associate yourself with.

And to answer the person who asked who pulls or squats 5x raw, the answer is Andrej Stanazek, who lifts in the IPF. A drug free and highly respected federation.

He lifted that raw and yes, he is a midget.

Being a low key indivudual, this was hard and almost regretting yet I am proud that I took the time to voice a researched opinion.

I believe that this is a hobbie and that lifting raw and drug free is good for the mind body and soul and that:

Taking steroids

Using equipment other than whats necissary.

Dehyrating your body to enter lower weight classes than your true weight class

Taints this sport.

This has nothing to do with getting better.

You want to get better? You start by training but you have to THINK before you act.

Its to show people like me to not get discourshed by all the bullshit that gets pulled off in this sport now.

Theres no such thing as a 1000 pound bench press in raw powerlifting.

No one cares about it becuase you dont see ridiculus numbers in it.

This is a testimonial and a "researched" peice of work.

I didnt falsely represent myself anywhere in here and since everything I said was true, there really isnt much room for argument other than the fact that I do in fact need more research.

But its not meant to be that brutally accurate.

If I wanted, I could take time that I dont have and make a better one.

Lets keep our comments nice and mature.

But at anyrate I appreciate all the critisim good and bad.

Friends Don't Let Friends Squat High

Hey you know what,

maybe one day I'll write about some jokes instead that way you can all laugh. And I can feel good about myself. LOL!

Anyways I am going away...

I have studying I need to do.

Mike Good job!
We just miss understood your chart and thought it was for everyone.
Bottom line is guys like you are the future of the sport, so don't take the comments from this post to hard!

Good luck in your training and college!

Michael TaylorYou are correct when you say only a handfull of people ever pulled 900.

But I am correct to say that people that pull 900 are elite and that most people in the SHW pull in the 900s, which is what is stated well, implied. I should of done better wording with that.

[/quote wrote:

I think the effort you put into this was great and it will help you get a better understanding of the sport. However, I completely disagree that "Most people in the SHW's pull in the 900's" because that is not accurate. In the multi-ply non tested meets you have a few that can do 900 (according to this site's rankings 2 did over 900 in 2007, one of them being Bolton). In the single ply 865 was the best pull of the year, and in raw 810 was the best followed by a few more in the middle/low 700's. Remember Mark Henry's deadlift of 903 is the current American Record for pulls so that happened once many years ago and it is still around.

My other suggestion is when you do bodyweight formulas you also give an absolute weight. For example, you could say a 2x bw bench press is elite or a 400 lb bench press, whichever is lighter. That generally pleases everybody to some extent.

Anonymous wrote: "I'd be shocked if there were very many guys who could pull 900 on a trap bar."

Me too. As one of the people who helped popularize the Gerard Trap Bar over twenty years ago, I'd be interested in seeing the Trap Bar that can safely hold 900 lbs. I suspect it would be a true iron monstrosity.

Gunny Green raw benched 530 in the 220 class and was drug free. Does anybody know about anybody else that is drug free and that can raw bench more then Gunny in the 220 class?

Roy Lamont wrote:
Mike Good job!
We just miss understood your chart and thought it was for everyone.
Bottom line is guys like you are the future of the sport, so don't take the comments from this post to hard!

Good luck in your training and college!

Thank you so much.

And this chart was meant for the 198 pound division.

Brian wrote:
Gunny Green raw benched 530 in the 220 class and was drug free. Does anybody know about anybody else that is drug free and that can raw bench more then Gunny in the 220 class?

Dennis Cieri (sp) did 529 raw at 220 and Rock Lewis did 600 at 242 but he was only 229 (I believe) when he did it, I am not sure how much the extra 9 lbs would affect him.

I think Paul Bossi would have somewhat similar numbers at his best.

All of the above are just sick benches.

MT, you missed a great puller in Lamar Gant, equipped 688 lbs at 132 bodyweight. Easily 5x raw lol. Long time IPF champion and well, a truly great puller. Having known Lamar, he was too laid back to cheat lol. And he didn't have to, being just a freak of nature. No dwarf though...

strength is not linear. let's get that one sorted. second, there's a lot of long time records that say you're way off course.

with all due respect, stop trying to figure out statistics and go use some chalk ok.

there ARE sufficient formulae out there, including the Siff factors, which do account for the way strength is higher in multiple in smaller lifters...and the imperfect but often used weight coefficients also account for this.

reinventing the wheel is without purpose, better men have already done this and you probably will do better to work out than work your brain cells right now. good try though....nsca-lift.org is where you can find more info on what's already been done lol.

IT IS GREAT TO SEE A YOUNGSTER WITH SO MUCH ENTHUSIASM. MICHAEL, I AM A RECENT ALUMNUS OF THE NATIONAL CHAMPION LSU TEAM AND STILL TRAIN WITH THE TEAM. WE WOULD LOVE TO DISCUSS NEXT YEAR WITH YOU, AS WELL AS YOUR TRAINING NOW. HIT ME UP AT MY EMAIL, LSUPOWERLIFTERDC@YAHOO.COM, OR CHECK OUT THE WEBSITE AT POWERLIFTING.LSU.EDU.

Paul Kelso wrote:
Anonymous wrote: "I'd be shocked if there were very many guys who could pull 900 on a trap bar."

Me too. As one of the people who helped popularize the Gerard Trap Bar over twenty years ago, I'd be interested in seeing the Trap Bar that can safely hold 900 lbs. I suspect it would be a true iron monstrosity.

I have done 800 one with a close miss at 825. I know Josh Bryant did over 800 at the same competition.

DAREN wrote:
IT IS GREAT TO SEE A YOUNGSTER WITH SO MUCH ENTHUSIASM. MICHAEL, I AM A RECENT ALUMNUS OF THE NATIONAL CHAMPION LSU TEAM AND STILL TRAIN WITH THE TEAM. WE WOULD LOVE TO DISCUSS NEXT YEAR WITH YOU, AS WELL AS YOUR TRAINING NOW. HIT ME UP AT MY EMAIL, LSUPOWERLIFTERDC@YAHOO.COM, OR CHECK OUT THE WEBSITE AT POWERLIFTING.LSU.EDU.

Well, Daren I remember you at the gym. I'm the "hot dog" kid. I told you my diet was lot's of milk and hot dogs. Hahaha wow, this is so funny, reading this after five months. My punctuation's def better.

I also know more about powerlifting and this subject. I did pay quite a few visits to the Middleton Library to read.

Uh, well I don't think coming to the gym would be a problem, after all I do STILL train in a Morgan shed. I'll make some arrangements after I get a new job because I'm not driving at the moment.

I'll e-mail you the rest.

lol Yea it looks good, but it's not really accurate. Especially since it was based on Drug-free and raw.
My raw squat is higher than the WR in my weight class and age bracket, and according to this chart, my squat and the guy with the record are only average squatters lol.

Also, according to this chart, Sam Byrd's raw squat of 710 @ 210 or so is only "good." lol