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Are There Any 600 Pound Benchers In The NFL?

There are a lot of big, strong guys who play in the NFL, but how would they do in a powerlifting meet? That's the subject of an Iron Trybe thread.

So Tyler McMeans a guard for the Bears is in the gym friday. (chicago bears have there training camp at the college in town). Now he walks in the gym walks to the bench throws 405 on and knocks it out for an easy 10. hmm my buddy and one of the trainers look at me and say WTF. Next to 495 for an easy 10 then im like WTF. 545 for 6 and then onto 585 for 6. Now this is with no spotter no hand off so he must have felt pretty comphy doing this. I know reps has no comparison to max weight but do you think that some of the NFL freaks might be able to knock down some crazy numbers..

please discuss let me know what you think... Once again i understand that alot of lifters were once football players blah blah. but do you think any one playing now might be able to have a very high 6 or low 7 bench./p>

Replies:

Can they destroy PL's probably not.Cause Powerlifters "Powerlift" and football players play football.Each sport has attributes that the other doesn't and vice versa.Who has probably the better percentage of raw talent?Football cause thats where the big bucks are and thats gonna attract great athletes.

There was a video a couple years ago of Larry Allen doing a 700 pound bench press with a bounce and a bit of assistance from his spotters. So yes, I would presume there are probably a handful of guys in the nfl who could handle 600+ pounds raw under PL meet conditions.

If there were any guys out there that could say break the raw record I think they would have done it already. It would be great PR and big bragging rights for the organization.

the average person would have no idea who has the record or even an idea of what it is.

Exactly. You have to be IN this stuff to have any
idea what the WR raw bench is. I garuntee 90% of the guys in the league don't have a clue. Heck, I bet most ppl on this board don't know what it is for that matter. If you look at some of the colleges lifting records there are some huge numbers out there. The K-state bench record is 610 for instance. I just picked up Muscle and Fitness the other day at the super market and Vernon Davis was on the cover. What a freak. 685 squat and 480 bench in the first semester of his junior year of school. Squats 525 for 10 now. At 6'3" and 255 do I think he could do a lot more than that? Definately. But, to quote the Low Land Gorilla, it's not if they can or can't, the fact is they aren't, so we'll never know.

Not to mention, it doesnt make much sense for them to do that. The risk of injury isnt worth it. I am sure no GM would be happy to hear that his star players tore a pec in a bench off.

Based on my experience the NFL guys don't care that much about absolute numbers. Lorenzo Neal, a good fullback was in the gym training beside me one day and he looked like a tank, but he was using pretty candy type weights for what I figured he would be doing. He said he didn't need to do any higher weights. The weight training is a means to an end; not the end in itself. Pushing it beyond what is helpful to their sport is not useful. I'm certain that lots of those guys if they threw themselves into training all out for weight training would be very good at it. Would they automatically take down the very top guys like Kennely and Mendelson? I doubt it. Those guys are probably about as genetically gifted for bench as it gets. Keep in mind how specific genetics are. There are probably tons of guys riding the bench that can out bench the starting players, but they are not as good at football. Bench is not a great indicator of how athletic you will be on the field. Cleans are much better I think at predicting this.

I will say that the workout described above is very impressive. 585x6 is not something I think many NFL guys could do. Based on that it sounds like this guy McMeans may be able to bench 700 raw if he tapered down for it.

I think that is the exception though and not the rule for all NFL players.

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Other than Larry Allen, I really haven't heard any astronomical numbers due to the different style of today's training methods. I am a diehard Steelers fan and consider them being the pioneers of strength training for football. With their methods guys like Mike Webster and Jon Kolb were reported to have been able to push well over 500lbs. routinely at a time when offensive linemen only weighed 260-275. Steve Courson claims in his book that he was able to do reps with 500+. It seems the trend has leaned more towards injury prevention and conditioning vs. building brute strength like the Steelers did in the 70's. I don't doubt that alot of these players would push 600 if they trained for it but what good would a player be if he had a big bench but kept getting hurt or worse, kept getting your high-priced QB or RB killed.

Without training and in competition probably not. With minimal training there may be a few.

There are lots of athletes in other sports, past and present that could bench 600. Football players and shot putters more than others. They use it as training, to aid them in thier sport and could probably give two shits what the record is.

What is more amazing is the number of people who that that is the greatest lifting acheivement or something. A squat or a deadlift is significantly more impressive and more useful in sports than a bench. Lying down and pushing weight off your fat belly correlates to what athletic movement?

Anonymous wrote:

Lying down and pushing weight off your fat belly correlates to what athletic movement?
I believe the indicator is pushing weight away from the body, i.e. run blocking or handling force in that direction.

When in football are you forced to put a guy on your back and squat down and stand back up? What about bending down to pick up a maximal weight like the deadlift?

Those two are not relevant at all to football with the exception of strong legs for driving power.

Are you seroiusly trying to say that for a football player, the bench is more important than a squat or a deadlift?

Wow.

It's difficult to determine what is most important to a football player regarding major lifts. Deadlifts and squats are incredible important because players who start in the 3 or 4 point position have to stand up with a very fast and powerful movement to block against their opponennts. Strong legs and lower back are responsible for driving a player forward through heavy resistance. Benching, however, is also a huge help when blocking and tackling. It seems to me that one would benefit from utilizing all three powerlifting movements for optimal performance on the field. Don't try to put one lift above the others.

WWW.ATLARGENUTRITION.COM

Well, many of the best best powerlifters are former football players. I am sure there are some tremendously strong men in the NFL.

Brian wrote:
I am a diehard Steelers fan and consider them being the pioneers of strength training for football. With their methods guys like Mike Webster and Jon Kolb were reported to have been able to push well over 500lbs. routinely at a time when offensive linemen only weighed 260-275. Steve Courson claims in his book that he was able to do reps with 500+.

Jon Kolb benched well over 550 and i have a picture of him squatting 750 in a belt and knee wraps. Larry Brown close grip benched 505 with his thumbs touching, and if you ever saw his triceps you would know why.

Anonymous wrote:
Are you seroiusly trying to say that for a football player, the bench is more important than a squat or a deadlift?

Wow.

Congradulations on your reading skills. Most impressive.

Not really, i believe "football" strength and powerlifting strength are two different things. I am a naturally good football player, but im noty really strong with powerlifting. But if i would play football against a kid whos good at powerlifting i would destroy him. You ever see Brian Urlacher, the guy is big but i dought he can lift that much. There two different worlds.

Thats because they are just naturally good ball players. If you take someone that is good at football, and training him to bench, squat and deadlift very heavy, he would be a lot better. Of course they are 2 different worlds, they are 2 different sports. You make it sould like being a good powerlifter automatically makes you a bad football player.

Powerlifting is the only way to train for football all 3 lifts are very important and translate well.

For Anonymous who questions the importance of the BP for football,

All lifts performed are designed to increase basic strength and conditioning. Of course no one is trying to say that one has to do an actual BP during play, but the brute strength and explosive power built in the arms, shoulders, and chest is as important as that built in the legs, hips, and back from squats, cleans, and deadlifts. No one part is more important than another as they all contribute to the total package. A training program which includes a lot of powerlifting to build strength and power as well as faster, more coordinated movements like cleans, snatches, and so on to build coordination, aggressiveness, and explosion will build the raw material from which to develop. Add in agility drills, play drills, and general conditioning work like running and kettlebells, and you've got a multi-dimensional program for developing a total athlete.

Oh, I used to know Randy White from the Cowboys, and that 500+ BP ability served him well in decking guys in many cases bigger than him. Crawford Kerr was another one who benched, I believe, 545, and the guy could hit like a truck. Speaking from experience, a guy who benches 300 doesn't hit anywhere near as hard as a guy who benches 400, no matter how strong their legs are. If the strong legs don't have a strong core to transfer through and a strong upper body to translate the hit, the guy just won't make an impact.

I'm sorry but the numbers you threw out about the player from the Bears are bullcrap! Back when I benched 640lbs. (for the state of Oregon record) and also was able to bench 400lbs. for 20 reps. I couldn't do anything close to 585 for 6 reps or 495 for 10! On top of it you say that the guy came in and lifted off the 6 wheels by himself and then did it for 6 reps?! You're full of it! Even if he could lift 585 off and rep it for 6 it would be suicidal and put his shoulders in serious jeorpardy taking that much weight out of the rack in that position is beyond stupid! Why aren't other readers calling you on this?! You are aware 585lbs is 6 wheels on each side and 495 is 5 wheels on each side, right?! Maybe your glasses were foggy?